Posts Tagged ‘lazy daisy stitch’

The ‘beginning’ is my Dorian Gray book. Finally happy with the piece I wrote from my research on saffron, I used a mixture of handwritten and printed sections to go with the first lot of samples I’d dyed.

I used four pieces of the saffron dyed muslin, layered up, as a background for the chain stitch title on the first page. I created the yellow blotches on the pages by dropping the wet saffron onto it after I’d dyed the fabric.


I’d written a lot about references I’d found to saffron and saffron-dyed clothing in Greek literature so that was printed in a little booklet on the next page, where I tried to write saffron in both Arabic and Greek. Apologies to native writers…


The samples form the bulk of the next pages, interspersed with information on the etymology of the word and the technicalities of how it dyes.


The ‘middle’ is more of the bluework, thanks to a couple of meetings.


Seeding to knock back the blanket stitched flowers, as they were a bit too brash.


Next I used a pretty composite stitch along the foot of the bowl. It starts with bundles of long detached lazy daisy stitches which are then wrapped around the middles to pull them in, a little like sheaf stitch. Clusters of french knots in a variegated thread are finally added to look like flower heads.


The ‘end’ was the sample piece I stitched during my stitch play workshop in December. It was nearly finished, just needing the blanket and trellis stitch on the dark green petals, and made the perfect Mothers’ Day card.


In other news, I think I have finally stopped sulking about my Victorian box project and am hoping to be able to show you some progress next week!


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I love spiky allium heads. After having done some ‘long shots’ on a couple of the sections in my bluework bowl, I decided that I wanted the next section to be a closer view and I chose an allium head for that.

First, the main stem in herringbone stitch and the stems which carry the flower heads radiating from a central point.


Then a solid couple of hours stitching through a committee meeting got the six petalled individual florets in lazy daisy stitch added.


I used the same variegated silk to outline the stem in split stitch and then built up adjoining rows of split stitch to form the leaf.


As all the other sections are in Victorian china style blue and white, I wanted to introduce other shades of blue, but I’m not entirely convinced now…

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I knew it was a while since I started this piece, but was stunned to check back through my archive and find it was 2012! We were doing a redwork workshop at Embroiderers’ Guild, stitching cups, plates, teapots etc. in various stitches with red threads. I’m not the biggest fan of red, so don’t have a lot of red threads and also, crockery to me always means blue and white, so I went off piste a bit and started to stitch this bowl.

More bluework 2

It’s a big piece for me and shortly after I took this photo, something else became more pressing and it lapsed. As the huge french knot piece is currently still in abeyance, I wanted something slightly more long term to stitch and the bluework fitted the bill. I’ve not done an awful lot more, but I have finished the leaves on the ribbon rose section, which are two lazy daisy stitches nested inside each other.


I even managed to find a close match for the thread – there was no chance that after 4+ years I was going to remember what I’d originally used!!

My plan was that each section of the bowl would be filled with a different flower design, using different techniques and styles, so several happy hours have been spent on Pinterest gathering inspiration and I’m looking forward to getting going with it again.

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A couple of years ago I was delighted to come across a vintage white metal brooch with spaces I could fill with stitching. An offcut of pelment vilene and a few french knots later, I created one of my first upcycled brooches.

So I was delighted when I found a very similar brooch recently. Pink vilene this time…


…and tiny stem and lazy daisy stitches in a single strand of silk made tree branches with leaves.


Another branch on the other side with cream french knots for cherry blossom and odd blossoms and leaves in the central section.


Mounted into the brooch.


And popped into my Etsy shop. Another quick finish.

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It’s reading for a new show time again and so I have managed to sit and stitch through a number of small finishes. Firstly, one of the designs Ruth produced for us at November’s Embroiderers’ Guild meeting, made up into a card.

The border is in feather stitch, the centre in a spiral of split stitch, the main oval parts of the petals in Corded Brussels stitch (needlelace) and the ends in satin stitch.


Then I decided to make up a little magazine kit I bought from eBay in 2009. Simple stem stitch and lazy daisy stitch for the wheel barrow and the flowers/leaves.


Then french knot middles to the flowers and my first ever attempt at a Dorset Button for the wheel.


I was fairly pleased with it until I put the kit picture next to it for comparison…


Obviously a technique I need to work on but it has made a nice little card.

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Saturday sort of got away from me. I knew I wasn’t going to make the morning session of our Embroiderers’ Guild meeting but I had high hopes of making the afternoon. That was a mistake. I finally walked through the door at about 3pm and by the time I’d caught my breath, looked round at all the various boards, tables and displays and sorted my travelling book there was only enough time for chatting (always good, though) and putting literally a handful of stitches in one of the activities that our new chair, Ruth, had organised for us.


Pauline had finished her bookmark and was happy to let me photograph it.



Another group was stitching heart shaped decorations. This one is Julie’s:


Debbie and Janet pulled together their matryoshka with the examples Ruth had already stitched for me to photograph.


There was also another flower shaped decoration or similar but I didn’t manage to find any worked examples of that. It looked like a nice selection of fun things to stitch and even though I only had an hour, it was lovely to relax with some straightforward stitching and good company.

I’ve also been making some more ribbon roses to turn into pendants. This one has fly stitch leaves, stem stitch stems and lazy daisy sepals in variegated coton a broder with a woven spider’s web rose and french knot buds in pale blue silk ribbon.


And this one has fly stitch leaves, split stitch stems and lazy daisy sepals in variegated perle with a woven spider’s web rose and french knot buds in crimson silk ribbon.


A weekend of nice quick little projects.

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I used little iridescent green delicas to create the beaded feather stitch on the right hand side of the piece. It’s a stitch I’ve used before but with ordinary seed beads and I’m not completely happy with the angular look the delicas give but I didn’t have any suitable seed beads and time was ticking on so it had to stay.

Red green crazy patchwork 1

The addition of french knot buds/flowers and lazy daisy leaves softened it a bit.

Red green crazy patchwork 2

More star stitched spotty birds outlined in chain stitch.

Red green crazy patchwork 3

And the whole thing is starting to fill up nicely.

Red green crazy patchwork 4

Lazy daisy flowers in two weights of Caron Christmassy red and green variegated thread with beaded middles.

Red green crazy patchwork 5

But then ‘stuff’ happened and on the night before our last meeting of the year I was only this far on!

Red green crazy patchwork 6

The beaded fly stitch leaves were still to be finished before I could even start to mount it in the book so I set my alarm for early on the Saturday morning and grafted! By lunchtime it was completed and mounted and I was able to head off (slightly late) to our knot garden canvaswork workshop.

Red green crazy patchwork 6

Red green crazy patchwork 7

Red green crazy patchwork 8

Red green crazy patchwork 9

It was slightly too big for the page so the fabulous Indian trim I’d found for the border has encroached on some of the designs a little too far and mitred corners would have looked much neater but time had pretty much evaporated by this point. I hope Elaine likes it anyway. I really must pace myself better in future!

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