Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘workshop’

At In The Stitch Zone, the weekly embroidery class I run locally (information in the tab at the top) we’re working on a longer project based on my avocado dyed long cloth which I began back in 2011 and am still stitching into on an occasional basis.

Avocado long cloth 1

Time to make up packs of natural dyed fabrics, threads, lace, ribbon etc. for everyone. I found some avocado, red cabbage and walnut dyed fabrics from sessions I’d done before, which was a good start.  I’d only even dyed with red cabbage and a touch of vinegar, so hearing that you could get an amazing range of greens with bicarbonate of soda I decided to experiment. The greens really are gorgeous – especially against some avocado and red cabbage (with vinegar) dyed pieces!

DSCN7780

DSCN7529 As I dye everything in the kitchen using my ordinary utensils, I don’t mordant and only use food stuffs as dyes. I know red cabbage is supposed to be fugitive, but some of the pieces I found (admittedly in a drawer) from the last lot of dyeing I did are eight or nine years old and are still a lovely colour.

I also bought some annatto seeds from our local oriental grocer and they were an complete revelation! Bright orange initially with golden yellow as the dye bath became exhausted and they even dyed a piece of nylon lace (which I unfortunately forgot to get a photo of…) No filter needed on these silk samples.

IMG_20200221_175102

As the annatto seeds are incredibly hard and I didn’t want to stain the coffee grinder bright orange, I crushed some in a pestle and mortar and when that got too difficult, just put the whole lot into the slow cooker to create the dye bath. Then, of course, they were nice and soft, so after I’d done the first lot of dyeing, I whizzed them up in the food processor (didn’t stain it, I’m glad to report!) and got a second dye bath out of the pulverised seeds. A softer golden yellow, but still lovely.

DSCN7782

Packs for everyone plus some spares.

DSCN7527

They are slowly turning into some gorgeous pieces of work!

Read Full Post »

Being the Dame’s Dresser in pantomime involves nice quiet periods in between bouts of frantic physical activity where I am trying to haul one costume (including wig, jewellery, shoes etc.) off a huge burly bloke while trying to simultaneously shove him into his next frock and wig. So once I’ve tidied up the chaos and returned the changing room to a temporarily Zen-like place of calm, I get to stitch.

Ribbon roses at the beginning of the week for my Stitch Zone ribbon embroidery workshop the next Monday. As I was working under dressing room lights the colours aren’t great, but it’s purples and lilacs on a indigo dyed scrap of cotton.

IMG_20200109_195014

Then ribbon stitch leaves around the french knot buds and closed fly stitch leaves.

IMG_20200110_193058

Finally completing it with some tendril-like stems at the ends in split stitch and a couple more fly stitch leaves.

IMG_20200110_204358

At the end of the week I moved onto mushrooms! When we did the Bayeux Stitch workshop at Embroiderers’ Guild last July I was working on the baby leaf-tailed dragon, but I did have a sudden desire to stitch some big chunky mushrooms in Bayeux Stitch. I started by sketching a simple design freehand and then traced it onto some calico.

IMG_20200111_143644

The light in the changing room is good to stitch by but not to take photographs by and the green cap is really more of a teal.

IMG_20200111_185243

Salmon-pink spots, not red!

IMG_20200111_211134

And tan gills.

IMG_20200113_214604

Stalk in a darker brown which I think might have been vintage mending wool – it kept breaking.

IMG_20200114_111243

And then the outlining.

IMG_20200114_115357

A lot of fun to stitch. I’ve still got the gills to put in and the rest of the outline and highlights to do, but I’m really pleased with all the stitching (even the ubiquitous mending of seams, buttons and various fastenings etc. of show week) I got done during panto this year!

Read Full Post »

As regular readers will know, I am heavily involved in a local amateur dramatics group (Scunthorpe Little Theatre Club) and this time of year is panto time. As with last year I ended up doing costume again – hence the reason I’ve only just surfaced. This year it was Mother Goose, with a new script which I wrote as well as being Costume Mistress and Dame’s dresser. Not the least of my jobs was making hats for the goslings and trying to work out where was best to place the nostrils!

IMG_20200102_155610.jpg

But we’ve finished in theatre now – I just have every single costume (12 adults and 19 children, many with multiple costume changes) to wash and replace in our costume room.  It only took me until August last year…

But I did manage to design and stitch some Christmassy hoops for a workshop I taught before Christmas:

DSCN6792.JPG

 

DSCN6784.JPG

And a single snowflake which I stitched in silk:

IMG_20191219_000228.jpg

The workshop, held at Jaylaurs, in Brigg was a great success. Just five ladies but they got on so well with the designs and two of them have since sent me lovely photos of their finished stitching.

I also had a go at chenille work, making a Christmas card for my parents. I started with a cardboard ring and used crewel work to stitch over it. Not satin stitch but coming up the same side and then going back over, to reduce the bulk at the back.

IMG_20191217_093346.jpg

It was a long slow job…

IMG_20191217_105343.jpg

…as it needed lots of layers to make sure I got the fluffy chenille effect at the end.

IMG_20191217_230556.jpg

Now the fun bit – the cutting. Carefully in the middle. That meant I could get the card shape out but left me with a distinct space where it wouldn’t cover the base fabric.

IMG_20191219_090715.jpg

Vintage trim to the rescue. I’ve had this particular very seventies trim since I was very young, when my mother would allow me a metre of ribbon or trim when she went to the local haberdashers, but not the sweets that like all small children I would have preferred! Anyway, sweets would not have solved my problem here but the trim that I’ve never used before did!

IMG_20191219_091725.jpg

I stitched it down with little gold beads between the ‘flower’ sections and added a hand made gold bow at the bottom.

IMG_20191219_094216.jpg

Very Christmassy and very pleased with it. (Was a nightmare to post though…!)

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

If you are in or around North Lincolnshire on Friday 1st of November there are still places left on my Spectacular Spellbooks workshops at Normanby Hall Country Park.

DSCN5594

The workshops are suitable for anyone, whether adult or child, who is interested in learning two simple bookmaking techniques. First, you’ll make two origami books, each created from a single piece of paper with four basic folds and a cut. We’ll be making a blank ‘spellbook’ to fill with your own ideas…

DSCN5599

…and also one where you can collect and record fascinating facts and superstitions about some ‘magical’ medieval ingredients which I will have on display.

DSCN5595

You will also be able to make a third slightly bigger blank book…

DSCN5587

…with a cover created from random papers and a twig binding that can be decorated with fancy threads, beads etc.

DSCN5601

Then just add your spells!

DSCN5602

I’m providing the materials to make all three books which you take away with you at the end of the session.

IMG_20190903_134605

Please note that Park entry also applies, or please display your annual membership.

Places may be booked here. I am really excited about this workshop and looking forward to the ‘awe and wonder’ moment when with one last fold, the origami book suddenly appears in your hands. Never gets old, that one. :o)

Read Full Post »

I’ve been asked to run some hour long spellbook making workshops at Normanby Hall Country Park  for Hallowe’en and have had loads of fun designing and making some printable origami books and a blank book with a twig binding. Both types of book are simple enough to be made by even quite small children, but I think the results are good enough to appeal to adults too, so I’ve made it age 6+ to adult. The workshop details can be found here if you’re interested.

DSCN5594.JPG

I’ve been making origami books with children for years now and I reckon I can fold and cut one in about ten seconds flat! It’s a real ‘awe and wonder’ moment when you fold the cut sides over and a real book forms under your hands!

I’ve also discovered that I can use Publisher to design a sheet of A4 which when you fold it, the pages come out the right way. So as part of the workshop the participants will make an origami book to gather information about some plants and stones that were considered to have magical properties in the Middle Ages.

DSCN5596.JPG

DSCN5595.JPG

Then another origami book for their own spell book

DSCN5599.JPG

And a bigger twig book…

DSCN5587.JPG

…with a corkscrew hazel twig that can be decorated for the binding.

DSCN5601.JPG

Which can also be decorated and made into a spell book.

DSCN5602.JPG

Fingers crossed now that people like the look of the books enough to want to make their own..!

Read Full Post »

The stumpwork course I taught at Ashby Link last week went really well, although I do need to be more realistic about the amount of work that the participants can reasonably do in the time allowed – I planned enough for at least two full days!

After learning some raised embroidery stitches and techniques in the morning, I created a little ball topiary design for them to work in the afternoon based on three of them: padded satin stitch, a french knot slip and raised stem band.

The french knots for the leafy part of the topiary were worked separately on a piece of calico in six strands of stranded cotton, partly so it worked up more quickly and partly to get a lovely textured effect. Great place to use up all those odd ends of stranded cotton!

IMG_20190630_213812.jpg

I used a circle of pelmet vilene to pad it out a little and then drew the calico up round the vilene…

IMG_20190630_215040.jpg

…before stitching it in place on my main fabric, which just so happens to be a piece of one of the shirts I chopped up for the cuff books workshop last week.

IMG_20190630_233828.jpg

Then the pot. Satin stitch over a base shape in pelmet vilene.

IMG_20190701_100146cropped.jpg

The raised stem band rim is worked separately, and just sits on top of the pot. Guideline shape for the padding.

IMG_20190701_100431.jpg

Long stitch padding with the vertical bars.

IMG_20190701_101903.jpg

And the stem stitch over the top. Very pleased with the effect!

IMG_20190701_103639.jpg

Just the stem/trunk to add.

IMG_20190701_103659.jpg

I used several long satin stitches in stranded silk and then used a single strand of it to couch random threads down with tiny stitches.

IMG_20190701_105902.jpg

It’s reminded me how much I enjoy raised work and needlelace, so now the end of term is finally in sight, I might start dabbling again.

Read Full Post »

I first had the idea for putting a pamphlet stitched booklet inside the cuff of a shirt or jacket about 6 years ago and although I’ve since seen images on the internet, I’m proud to say it was it was an idea I had all by myself!

Denim cuff books

It’s a great method for making notebooks to carry around in a bag or pocket as the button (or snap) on the cuff holds the pages closed and you have the length of the cuff to decorate.

Leaves book cover 1

So I was delighted to be asked to teach it as a workshop for Brigg Allsorts group last week.  Men’s shirts, my main source of cuffs, often are patterned in stripes or checks and the patterns are a great set of guidelines for keeping your stitches straight, so I chose a checked one and decided to have a go at some chicken scratch embroidery with cross stitch and rice stitch.

IMG_20190628_224624.jpg

I also replaced the boring button with one covered in scarlet silk. It’s fascinating how adding even simple stitches can alter your perception of the background design so much.

IMG_20190628_224607.jpg

One of the early projects on the seven week crazy patchwork course I’m running for North Lincolnshire Adult Education at Ashby Link was to piece three tiny scraps of fabric together with feather stitch and enhance them with stitches to make a crazy patchwork brooch. This is my example. Black and gold silk covered with lace on either side of a scrap of printed Japanese style cotton with a gold coloured metal motif stitched onto it.

IMG_20190614_180700.jpg

Kantha stitch knocks back the brightness of the print in the middle. Whipped back stitch and threaded chain stitch to the left and bullion roses with stem stitch stems and nested lazy daisy leaves on the right.

IMG_20190617_115535.jpg

I went for a very closely worked blanket stitch edging as the pieces of silk fabric were fraying very badly. It took a lot longer to finish, but I think the neat effect is worth it.

IMG_20190619_223002.jpg

One thing about teaching these courses, I have to get things finished to keep up with the learners!

 

Read Full Post »

The follow on course from the kantha and boro was boro and sashiko and as well as showing various pieces I’ve stitched over the years, I created a new sample piece for this, illustrating how a piece of boro could start to become sashiko.

First, arranging scraps of kimono fabric and indigo dyed cottons onto a cotton base layer. before tacking them down. The partly stitched piece in the middle is a scrap of unfinished sashiko from a very long time ago (2011 to be exact…).

IMG_20190424_172718.jpg

Simple running stitch becomes a rectangular spiral.

IMG_20190510_111937.jpg

The partial sashiko becomes rice stitch and I try my hand at keeping free hand cross stitch regular.

IMG_20190510_111949.jpg

Putting fabric marks in helped with the cross stitch, but I ended up aligning each row of stitches to the previous row and that worked better.

IMG_20190513_225301.jpg

The even rows became boxes.

IMG_20190516_214349.jpg

And a tiny scrap needed some bamboo leaves.

IMG_20190517_131302.jpg

It’s still not quite finished, but it was a pleasure to sew in that rhythmic, mindful way and I do prefer this type of boro/sashiko to stitching the beautiful but almost ‘paint-by’numbers’ of the intricate sashiko designs you get in kits.

And incidentally, our Fabric Fair was a huge success. Considering this was a relatively niche market in small town North Lincolnshire on a Sunday morning, we had a great turn out with locals and people coming from much further afield. There were some great traders with a wide selection of items and it was really positive to see so many people with a love of textiles gathered together.

Read Full Post »

Our March meeting at Scunthorpe Embroiderers’ Guild was Canvaswork Stitch play, led by me. Unfortunately, due to a combination of everything coming on top of each other,  being ill and then completely forgetting about the workshop until about two months before it was due to happen, I wasn’t as well prepared with samples as I would have liked. But I am pleased with what I did manage to stitch.

First sample was the same thread but different stitches.

IMG_20190506_082823.jpg

The upright cross stitch was a revelation. You would never guess that it was just upright crosses – I just love the interlocking texture it produces.

IMG_20190329_230243_BURST001_COVER.jpg

Then I worked a sample which was all the same stitch – cushion stitch, but stitched in as many different types of thread as I could. I am particularly pleased with the effect of the chenille (small pale beige rectangle at the bottom), which is such a difficult thread to actually stitch with anywhere else!

IMG_20190506_082757.jpg

IMG_20190506_082804.jpg

IMG_20190506_082810.jpg

I also had a lovely time running a Ribbon Roses workshop with Selby Embroiderers’ Guild. I had been experimenting with some pelmet vilene based brooches featuring the ribbon roses both with beaded blanket stitch…

IMG_20190302_184442.jpg

…and also normal blanket stitch edging.

IMG_20190306_201033.jpg

(The second one ended up as an emergency Mother’s Day card for a friend!!)

IMG_20190330_184644.jpg   IMG_20190330_184959.jpg

So I decided to turn the design into kits, which went down very well.

IMG_20190309_122948.jpg

And I even managed to turn my sample/teaching example piece from the workshop into a birthday card.

IMG_20190320_092237.jpg

And finally another piece of jewellery upcycled with a ribbon rose and beautifully modelled by my little one, who is not so little any more. :o(

IMG_20190309_185702.jpg

Available as always,  here in my Etsy shop.

Read Full Post »

Apologies – March has been mad. Between trying to shake illness and most of my workshops and courses all coming at once, things have been crazy. So, to catch up!

The found objects plastic rings piece I blogged about back in February, came together like a dream. I wanted to use it as a sample piece for a Found Objects Workshop I taught at Hull Embroiderers’ Guild at the end of March. (There is a lovely post about the workshop on their Facebook page.) It was a lot of fun trying out different ways of attaching the rings, including lazy daisy stitch, sheaf stitch and chain stitch.

I finished it as a quiltlet, with a border of strip patchwork, which makes it nice and robust to handle.

dav

Love the indigo dyed back.

dav

I also taught a Beaded Oglala Stitch workshop with Brigg Allsorts (a local stitching group) the same week, so after having made a sampler of variants of the stitch…

IMG_20190318_122937.jpg

…I started another found objects piece I could use with both workshops as it combined Beaded Oglala with found objects. It worked surprisingly well as a method of attaching the vintage key and I’m very pleased with the effect.

IMG_20190319_164854.jpg

I had a fabulous time teaching the workshop with the ladies in Hull and they produced some lovely work.

IMG_20190323_163136.jpgIMG_20190323_163133.jpg

IMG_20190323_163140.jpg

IMG_20190323_163148.jpg

We also had a fantastic workshop ourselves at Scunthorpe Embroiderers’ Guild in February, doing Print to Stitch with Jan Dowson.

IMG_20190223_112225.jpg

Jan had made us some great kits with paisley shaped printing blocks in them as a main focus…

IMG_20190223_112220.jpg

…but I had a couple of my own stamps that I wanted to use as well. Medieval tile first.

IMG_20190223_114826.jpg

Then the paisley. We used acrylic paints and instead of rollering it onto the block, I dabbed random areas of paint to get a mottled effect.

IMG_20190223_115838.jpg

Jan had also put some pieces of compressed foam into the kits. You can cut them with scissors into any shape and then drop them into water to get a sponge printing block, which is how I got  the over-printed tear drop shapes inside the paisleys.

IMG_20190223_121107.jpg

Lastly I had a shell stamp from home to play with.

IMG_20190223_122028.jpg

I love the look of the paint on the stamps…

IMG_20190223_122035.jpg

…and on the palettes.

IMG_20190223_122012.jpg

Once we had our printed fabric…

IMG_20190223_130449.jpg

…time to stitch. The border of the paisleys was a perfect place for Pekinese Stitch. Rayon back stitch for a bit of shine, interlaced with all six strands of a variegated stranded cotton thread.

IMG_20190223_150749.jpg

I will try harder on here, honestly! It’s all Susan from Stitchery Stories‘ fault – she recommended I got myself onto Instagram and I have been properly sucked in. It is so much quicker when you are busy – or lazy!!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Claire Steele Textiles

Art, Textiles and Photography

hertstitch

for embroiderers and textile artists in hertfordshire and beyond

karensstitchography

Embroidery & other craft

re:retro

collecting retro

View From Our Hill

Textile, Mixed Media, Yarn, Books and Beads

Things I find in the garbage

I'm a professional scavenger making a living selling curbside garbage. This blog details my finds and sales. It also acts as an archive for things beautiful and historic that would otherwise have been destroyed.

summerholiday111

stitching, creative textiles, inspiration

Stitched up with Thread

Slowly threading things together

Lincs In Stitches

Creative ramblings in the Lincolnshire Wolds

Kiln Fired Art Blog

Crafts and the outdoors - slow living involving handmade ceramics, painting, textiles, walking and good food

Hillview Embroidery

Teaching and Learning One Stitch at a Time

Dreaming In Stitches

a mingled yarn

sunshine and celandines

These are a few of my favourite things.

LucyAnn &Luna craft

crafting,dachshunds including other bits & bobs

Carlseapatch's Weblog

A log of progress (I hope)and fun in textile arts

seafieldview

Life on a Cornish cliff

late start studio

Late . . . in taking my creativity seriously.

Shibori Girl

....practicing the fine art of shibori

Pomegranate Studio

- because making is good for us

Fall from Grace Crafts

A blog on my craft journey highs and lows...

opusanglicanum

one Englishwoman's work

Playful Bookbinding and Paper Works

Chasing the Paper Rabbit

Chrissie Freeth - Tapestry Weaver

Blog of artist and tapestry weaver Chrissie Freeth

debbidipity

into textiles & beyond

KDD & Co

Award-winning Scottish publishing and design