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Posts Tagged ‘North Cornwall’

Glad you enjoyed the first part of the tour through my journal. Here’s part two.

Journal Tour 2a

Journal Tour 2b

Journal Tour 2c

Journal Tour 2d

Journal Tour 2e

Journal Tour 2f

Journal Tour 2g

Journal Tour 2h

Journal Tour 2i

Journal Tour 2j

Journal Tour 2k

Journal Tour 2l

Journal Tour 2m

Journal Tour 2n

Journal Tour 2o

Emulous waves 1

Journal Tour 2o

Reclaimed by the sea 1b

Finally finished. I really enjoyed the random nature of this, with days all over the place and some days contributing more ideas and pieces than others. No rules – my favourite way of working.

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It’s finally finished, and as Rachel pointed out, more or less in time for this year’s holiday! Just thought it might be interesting to take a virtual tour through the pages.

Holiday journal tour 1

Holiday journal tour 2

Holiday journal tour 3

Holiday journal tour 4

Holiday journal tour 5

Holiday journal tour 6

Holiday journal tour 7

Holiday journal tour 8

Holiday journal tour 9

 

Holiday journal tour 10

Holiday journal tour 11

Holiday journal tour 12

Holiday journal tour 13

Holiday journal tour 14

Holiday journal tour 14

Part two coming soon.

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…is nearly complete.

I think I blogged my progress part way through this piece using a long strand of wavy beachcombed rope, but it’s now finished…

Reclaimed by the sea 1a

…and stuck in place inside the back cover.

Reclaimed by the sea 1b

I didn’t like the big gold coloured three holed bead that was previously on the right; it was far too big and bright and angular when everything else was round or wavy, so I cut that off and finished the text with a swirl of french knots.

Reclaimed by the sea 1c

 

I did plan for this to be the last piece in the journal until I was turning out a drawer and found an odd piece of painted watercolour paper in the front of a long-forgotten sketchbook. Nice and thick to stitch through. I cut some wave shapes, chose some tiny scraps of silk and toning thread and started to play.

Emulous waves 1

Looking at those undulating curves, I couldn’t get the Walt Whitman quote (via Vaughan-Williams’  Sea Symphony) out of my head, so that went on too.

Emulous waves 2

Emulous waves 3

I’m very pleased with my unexpected find! Just one more job to do, but I can’t do that until I can get together everyone who went away with us.

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Driving down a tiny Cornish lane towards our cottage for the first time. Dog tired after 7 hours on the road but fizzing with excitement and anticipation for the week to come. Trees are encircling the lane: crowding overhead but never oppressive. Sections of dark velvety shade alternate with bright patches where sunlight streams through the leaves.

It was enchanting and I felt I had to somehow capture it as the first piece in my journal.

Shade and light 1

 

I started with watercolour on calico to mark out the road and the patches of light and shade and then used free cross stitch in variegated stranded Stef Francis silk to loosely cover the painted areas and add texture.

Shade and Light 2

After consideration I decided to keep the darker green section in the middle and the road as plain painted fabric to give contrast to the layered and overlapping texture of the stitches.

Shade and Light 3

The stitching was pretty straightforward but the words took longer.

Shade and Light 4

Still doesn’t quite express what I wanted to say. Perhaps I’ll never quite manage to capture in words the way my heart soars when I travel down these lanes but I can still feel an echo of it when I look at this tiny scrap of embroidery.

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As you’ve probably gathered, I’m a great lover of found objects. I love finding them just as much as I love using them and I was determined to source some debris pieces from the beaches we visited (Polzeath, Hawker’s Cove, Tintagel and Constantine Bay) to go into my journal. But of course, they had to fit in with the colour scheme of blues and greens!

Beach debris 1

 

I gathered a real selection of weathered and broken oddments, bits of fishing tackle and scraps of shredded rope and a selection of very funny looks as I went grubbing around in the tideline.

Beach debris 2

Back home a piece of bubble fabric in rusty gold with a scribbly pattern of green was the perfect background. I layered it on some hand dyed cheesecloth for extra strength and then began to arrange the (cleaned, scrubbed and dried) debris.

Beach debris 3

Overlapping elements, particularly the fragments of frayed rope, helped to hold other pieces in place as I was using no glue and trying to go for minimal visible stitching.

Beach debris 4

It wasn’t blue or green, but I loved the shape of the grey ring pull type thing at the bottom. The green and red rope was already bent so it fitted perfectly around the edge.

Beach debris 5

Shells, already thoughtfully holed by the dog whelk which ate the occupant, were chosen from my existing collection to be stitched on. The scraped and scoured plastic nuggets are beautifully tactile.

Beach debris 6

I’m so pleased with this piece. It came together quickly and easily and the bubble fabric works brilliantly as a background. It’s satisfyingly substantial in the hand, too.

Beach debris 7

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, they say.  🙂

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Early in our holiday we walked the Camel Trail from Wadebridge to Padstow and while in Padstow visited the National Lobster Hatchery as my youngest wanted desperately to adopt a lobster. I bought a gorgeous retro-styled tea-towel in the shop which came with a hand stamped tag depicting the two lobsters of the Hatchery logo that I had to incorporate into my journal.

Lobsters hiding in seaweed was my first thought.

I started with a base of light-weight hand dyed calico with splodges of deep green and then added some strips of dark green hand dyed scrim, which was all bunched up and curled up on itself. I stitched the scrim strips loosely to the background with blanket stitch and then cut round the fronds I’d created with a pair of sharp scissors, also adding some fronds of the base fabric to fill in any spaces.

Lobster Hatchery tag 1

I had some of the pale green silk organza ribbon I’d used to edge the cover left, so I cut it into shapes and used it to back some of the fronds by couching a line of green chenille thread down the middle of the whole frond.

Lobster Hatchery tag 2

I pierced holes in the edge of the tag and stitched through them with a simple running stitch in turquoise which I then whipped twice with a slubby thread.

Lobster Hatchery tag 2a

With the tag in place on top. The stamp hadn’t quite printed the whole image so I completed it in pencil and added black ink later.

Lobster Hatchery tag 3

Next, I cut a lobster claw shape from vilene and coloured it with water-soluble oil pastels. Reaching cautiously out from under the seaweed…

Lobster Hatchery tag 4

Stuck in place in the journal.

Lobster Hatchery tag 5

And the full spread.

Lobster Hatchery tag 6

Just need to add some text, possibly using one of the tags I made when I created the journal.

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I’ve mentioned before about how I love the herringbone effect Cornish slate walls. These are in Tintagel, bordering one of the car parks.

Slate wall, Tintagel 1

Great pattern and texture and something I wanted to explore again.

Slate wall, Tintagel 2

 

The day I took this picture, my husband walked from Boscastle to Tintagel to meet us and also photographed a similar wall on the coastal path, his one thick with leafy blue-grey lichen which gave me the the final image for my next journal piece.

Cornish slate wall 1

I decided to create the texture of the wall by using gesso on calico, dabbed on in three or four layers, building up the depth of the stones.  This was then coloured with watercolours which ran nicely into the cracks and crevices and gave it light and shade.

Cornish slate wall 2

Emboldened by the success of the stone effect, I decided to add a background, painting directly onto the calico with the watercolours.

Cornish slate wall 3

Variegated green thread in random straight stitches for the vegetation at the base of the wall…

Cornish slate wall 4

And short strands of blue-grey slubby thread, un-plyed (if you get what I mean) and couched down in little bows to mimic the lichen. It was interesting, stitching through the gesso-slathered calico!

Cornish slate wall 5

 

Stuck into place in the journal.

Cornish slate wall 6

This was so far out of what I normally do with the mixed media of gesso, paint and stitch, but I really love it – it all just worked exactly as I’d envisioned it.

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