Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Scunthorpe Embroiderers’ Guild’

If we have had a workshop of some sort at our Embroiderers’ Guild group, then at the next meeting there is a space available for people to bring their workshop pieces, whether finished or just continued, to show. It was fantastic to see what had happened to the stitch play pieces from my workshop in December.

20180127_140536_HDR.jpg

20180127_140541_HDR.jpg

20180127_140547_HDR.jpg

20180127_140551_HDR.jpg

20180127_140557_HDR.jpg

20180127_140607_HDR.jpg

20180127_140617_HDR.jpg

20180127_140635_HDR.jpg

Many thanks to everyone who brought along their work – glad you enjoyed it!

I’ve also been doing some more upcycling. First, I turned a single 1980s enamelled earring which looked like orange sherbet into a beaded brooch. I removed the post and then beaded it onto some hand dyed vintage cotton fabric with some matching pearlised opaque orange seed beads using peyote stitch.

20180118_164001_HDR.jpg

Then I gathered the spare fabric over the back and ladder stitched it to the covered vilene circle onto which I’d already stitched the brooch back.

DSCN8132.JPG

Then I could add the edging in a mixture of clear orange, opaque pale yellow and very pale lilac beads, to echo the colours in the swirl.

DSCN8129.JPG

It’s not a terribly quick thing to stitch, but a lot of fun to do!

Among the oddments I scored from my Dad’s workshop last year were some bits of veneer that he had hand cut. This little piece is apple wood.

20180114_105655_HDR.jpg

I wondered what would happen if I doodled on it in black pen…

20180114_105701_HDR.jpg

…and then cut it into sections to fit in this vintage bracelet.

20180114_105630_HDR.jpg

Measure twice, cut once…

20180114_105648_HDR.jpg

Hold your breath and hope…

20180114_105733_HDR.jpg

…and be pleasantly surprised at the result.

DSCN8125.JPG

 

I’ve also added nuggets of sea glass and sea washed china to a selection of vintage pendants, brooches and rings.

DSCN7960

 

DSCN7815.JPG

DSCN7984.JPG

DSCN6560.JPG

DSCN7967.JPG

DSCN7971.JPG

DSCN8367.JPG

They are all sitting in my Etsy shop now, waiting for loving homes!

Read Full Post »

The theme for our January EG meeting was ’21st Birthday’ – ours, to be exact, and we plan to mark it with an exhibition later in the year. The activity was for us all to stitch a letter to be made up into bunting for the exhibition in the following style:

20180127_142933_HDR.jpg

Liz had done a pile of lovely little counted work kits for us with the waste canvas all ready tacked onto the felt background and the promise that each letter should take no more than an hour to stitch.

It was a gorgeous little project, although anything counted tends to kill the atmosphere as you can’t count and chat at the same time! I ended up with a ‘T’ and had stitched it by the end of the session.

20180129_105124_HDR.jpg

Then I trimmed the waste canvas closely,

20180129_105353_HDR.jpg

damped it, and pulled the strands out.

20180129_134146_HDR.jpg

I’ve got an ‘R’ to stitch next.

A friend has been giving me various odds and ends for upcycling as she clears her dad’s house, and some while ago, among the oddments was a vintage two-strand bead necklace with a damaged catch which was very much in her favourite colours but too short. I took it home and restrung it, interspersing the bigger glass beads with big copper coloured seed beads, which immediately made it longer while keeping the overall look.

 

20180126_195519_HDR

I found a bright red plastic cabochon which fitted the top of the catch perfectly and used closed fly stitch, closely packed, to embroider a scattering of tiny leaves in autumnal browns on a piece of hand dyed brown silk.

20180126_195529_HDR

Then I gathered up the silk over the cab, pulled it tight behind and stitched it securely before…

20180127_082049_HDR.jpg

… sticking it into place on the catch. I was very happy with the way it turned out and Debbie seemed pleased with it too.

 

20180127_083420_HDR.jpg

At the moment I’m researching and collecting natural dye stuffs and undyed linen, silk and wool to begin my first Dorian Gray project. Exciting!

Read Full Post »

First of all, Happy New Year to you all!  As promised, now the holiday period is out of the way, some more images of the stitch play workshop I ran at our December Embroiderers’ Guild meeting. I managed to stitch and mount four example pieces which between them showcase 48 different stitches, many of which were completely new to me.

DSCN7809.JPG

I provided everyone with a two-page worksheet containing the instructions and sixteen simple shapes from leaves and flowers to a star, bird, Christmas tree, heart etc to use as the base for their stitch play.  The results were fabulous.

20171216_153144_HDR.jpg

The background felt for Janet’s little robin was sparkly, which isn’t obvious in the photo, but made him look very festive!

20171216_153115_HDR.jpg

20171216_153053_HDR.jpg

20171216_153043_HDR.jpg

20171216_153029_HDR.jpg

20171216_153017_HDR.jpg

20171216_152958_HDR.jpg

20171216_152929_HDR.jpg

Pauline combined the stitch play idea with a felt project she already had on the go.

20171216_152917_HDR.jpg

All my pieces were stitched on light coloured felt so I could use a marker to keep my lines straight and equidistant, but pencil/markers don’t show up dark coloured felt so I made note of Sally’s use of guideline tacking stitches to keep her work level.

20171216_152852_HDR.jpg

20171216_152833_HDR.jpg

20171216_152754_HDR.jpg

20171216_152652_HDR.jpg

20171216_152635_HDR.jpg

20171216_152551_HDR.jpg

20171216_152520_HDR.jpg

20171216_152506_HDR.jpg

I admire the bravery of anyone, who like Christina, has a go at Rosette Chain Stitch, especially in stranded cotton!

20171216_152456_HDR.jpg

20171216_152423_HDR.jpg

20171216_145116_HDR.jpg

Don’t know why this one insists on going sideways!

20171216_135744_HDR.jpg

20171216_135733_HDR.jpg

Mary was also working on a project which lent itself to the stitch play.

20171216_135617_HDR.jpg

As a workshop it seemed to go down very well indeed. Pretty much everybody tried at least one stitch they hadn’t worked before/hadn’t worked for some time and everyone, from the most to the least experienced of us, was able to work and achieve at our own rate and ability level, which is what I had hoped would happen. :o)

Read Full Post »

Our December meeting was held last Saturday and was an all day Stitch Play workshop sort of in the style of Sue Spargo which I led – hence why so much of my recent stitching has been under wraps! There are so many images of the work that came out of it that I’m going to leave you hanging until after Christmas for a report on the workshop and instead just show the results of our Christmas Challenge, which was set at the AGM in September to create a Christmas tote bag suitable either for an adult or a child.

We voted for our top five in each category by putting beads in a saucer.

20171216_121702_HDR.jpg

20171216_121718_HDR.jpg20171216_121710_HDR.jpg

20171216_121724_HDR.jpg

20171216_121731_HDR.jpg

The winner of the children’s bag section was Sally, with her intricate gingerbread house and biscuit button topped roof on the right in the photo.

20171216_121706_HDR

Hazel’s bag (far left) is fitted with fairy lights in the middle of each star which actually light up!

20171216_121633_HDR.jpg

20171216_121640_HDR.jpg

20171216_121648_HDR.jpg

20171216_121651_HDR.jpg

20171216_121655_HDR.jpg

The competition in the adult’s bag section was extremely close but Pauline’s Holly and the Ivy bag, on the left, won by a well-deserved whisker. I’m relieved that we had five votes because I could not have chosen just one.

20171216_121628_HDR.jpg

If I’ve missed anybody’s bag, my apologies! I’ll leave you with a long shot of the Challenge Bags in the background and a glimpse of my table set up with materials and examples…

20171216_121617_HDR.jpg

Have a fabulous Christmas!

Read Full Post »

For various reasons, this is the first Scunthorpe Embroiderers’ Guild meeting I’ve been to since June. Quite a number of our members are eager to get stuck into another round of Travelling Books so we had a lovely display of the initial pieces, ready for their next outing.

20171118_114004_HDR.jpg

We were joined by Hull Branch and the day was led by their own Alison Larkin. The last time we had a workshop with her was March 2014 when we stitched this miniature embroidery. She brought some of her exquisite miniatures along for us to marvel over. This one is about the size of a playing card.

20171118_114201_HDR.jpg

I tried to use the magnifier to give some idea of how minute these little stitched pictures are.

20171118_114155_HDR.jpg

I just love this Tudor/Jacobean style miniature bedspread. This is only about a third of it and the whole thing is no bigger than an A5 envelope.

20171118_114229_HDR.jpg

This time we had a talk in the morning about her big recent project, a recreation of a waistcoat stitched by Captain James Cook‘s wife Elizabeth. The original is stitched on tapa cloth, which is actually the inner bark of the paper mulberry tree, brought to Europe by Cook from one of his earlier voyages. Although the stitching has been completed, the waistcoat was never made up as Cook died in Hawaii in 1779.

Alison talked us through the whole process of researching the waistcoat, which was not only looking at the design of the original, which is held in a library in Sydney, but also working out the size, stitches used, methods of construction etc. before she could even start stitching. The finished item, much of which she stitched in period costume at the Captain Cook Memorial Museum in Whitby, is stunning.

20171118_122231_HDR.jpg

The tapa cloth has the look of a slubby silk dupion from a distance and it’s only when you get up close that you can see it’s actually a non woven fabric.

20171118_122156_HDR.jpg

In the afternoon Alison led a blackwork workshop, where we could try out various designs of hers on a variety of different fabrics. I opted for 18 count aida and a lovely acorn tile design.

DSCN7321.JPG

I love blackwork. The intricacies of the designs really appeal, so much so that I don’t even mind the counting involved and was happily engrossed for the rest of the afternoon in getting as far on with my design  as I could.

DSCN7322.JPG

This should be a nice quick finish and become a scissor keep for my big fabric scissors.

Read Full Post »

Our Scunthorpe Embroiderers’ Guild June meeting was an all day workshop on Casalguidi work. It was led by Pauline,  who bravely stepped into the breach as the lady who was supposed to be leading it was been seriously ill this year. We started off with a display of examples not only of Casalguidi but also other types of whitework, including some Ruskin lace, from one of the Guild portfolios.

20170624_123244_HDR.jpg

20170624_123240_HDR.jpg

The Ruskin lace was stunning and equally as good as any of the pieces at the Ruskin Museum in Coniston.

20170624_103158_HDR.jpg

But it was the heavier Casalguidi work that we were focusing on.

20170624_103133_HDR.jpg

20170624_103138_HDR.jpg

Pauline had provided plenty of threads, linen in different weights and worksheets for us to practise some of the basic stitches, such as four-sided stitch, a pulled thread stitch used to create the background texture of the embroidery, and raised stem band.

20170624_103357_HDR.jpg

So, after we had oversewn round the linen to stop it fraying, it was time to practise. Four-sided stitch at the top and two raised stem bands, one showing the foundation stitches, at the bottom.

20170624_122746_HDR.jpg

I started off in a neutral coloured thread, but after using an oddment of variegated perle in yellow, leaf green and cream to mark out the little bag we were going on to make…

20170624_122741_HDR.jpg

I couldn’t resist ditching the beige thread for something a bit more interesting. In the end, after working a couple more samples, I decided to make a start on the main design for the bag. It’s not a quick stitching project as it’s a form of counted stitch work and not only do you have to concentrate on making sure your counting is right, but you also have to make sure the pulling is even and the stitches in the right order. So my results, even after a bit of stitching since, are not very exciting.

DSCN5509.JPG

DSCN5511.JPG

It’s getting there slowly as I need good light and not to be tired when I’m sewing, but I am enjoying it and looking forward to getting the four-sided stitch ground finished so I can play with some of the other elements.

Read Full Post »

It was our Embroiderers’ Guild Meeting the Saturday before last and between taking my little one for her tennis lesson and not checking the timings on the extremely clear and useful newsletter which our secretary always sends out just prior to the monthly meeting, I managed to roll up late as usual.

By the time I sidled in, everyone was engrossed in their English Paper Piecing project set up by our chair, Ruth, in the morning. As well as providing fabric and sheets of templates, Ruth had brought a fabulous display of books, works in progress and completed projects to inspire.

20170429_131904_HDR.jpg

20170429_131908_HDR.jpg

20170429_131911_HDR.jpg

20170429_131918_HDR

Debbie had been inspired by one of Ruth’s patchwork pouches and was well on with her own version in some glorious sunflower fabrics.

20170429_131827_HDR.jpg

I had gone for some oddments of prints and hand dyes in coffee shades with some indigo dyed cotton for my fabrics.

20170429_132232_HDR.jpg

Since I’ve been working with hexagons in Auntie Sheila’s patchwork project I decided to go for equilateral triangles for a bit of a challenge.

20170429_152445_HDR.jpg

I really enjoyed getting quite a few pieced in various fabrics so I could play around with some arrangements and I even got some stitched together, but not entirely sure where I’m going to take this next, which is irritating as it was a really good workshop and I like the colour and shape combinations. I’m sure something will come to me when I’m thinking about something else!

In June the Embroiderers’ Guild are having a stand at the annual Lincolnshire Show and members from various branches in the area have been asked to make some little bits and pieces which could be sold to raise funds and at least cover the cost of the stand. I had seen some little pincushion brooches on Pinterest which were made from puffs of stuffed fabric on a flat metal brooch type background. It just so happened that I had some new flat brass discs among my jewellery making kit, so I used a scrap of silk, a length of vintage crochet thread, a gold bead and a small amount of stuffing and made a prototype.

20170331_120612_HDR.jpg

There were ten of the stamped brass discs in the packet, so I decided to use all ten. Works in progress…

DSCN4325.JPG

And a couple of the finished articles.

DSCN4327.JPG

DSCN4330.JPG

They are now all neatly packed up and ready for the Show. Apparently our branch alone has amassed nearly a hundred items to sell!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »