Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘patchwork’

It was a pleasure to finish the little Bossa Nova Rose from our Embroiderers’ Guild Brazilian Dimensional Embroidery workshop last weekend. I didn’t follow the instructions when it came to the leaves, going for fly stitch over blanket stitch and not adding the fine pale green edging it suggested because I felt the sheen of the thread gave enough definition.

DSCN2966.JPG

DSCN2967.JPG

And then quickly finished as a card.

DSCN2978.JPG

My first sea glass and pocket watch case pendant positively flew out of my Etsy shop and I’ve started another one to go with a harlequin case of a gold coloured collar and engine turned back. I’ve got some tiny pieces of very rare yellow sea glass and some ordinary brown to add to this.

DSCN2984.JPG

I also turned some off cuts of hand dyed fabric, the batik I’m using above and some cotton print in shades of brown into some strip patchwork which I used to cover a grotty looking cabochon pendant…

DSCN2897.JPG

…turning it into an upcycled patchwork pendant with added vintage lace and flower trim.

Lots going on!

 

Read Full Post »

My Auntie Sheila was a wonderful woman. She was warm, kind, always elegantly dressed and effortlessly glamorous, arty and creative and I thought she was amazing. The only openly artistic member of our very practical family, she made it OK for me to be creative. I just wish I had really got into my textile art before she died in 2005. I know she would have been fascinated and supportive.

When she died, my uncle gave me a big box full of her craft bits and pieces. Most of it was card making type stuff, but there was a very pretty traditional style quilted patchwork bag, full of pieced paper hexagons. Some cut out ready to stitch, some covered but on their own, quite a lot formed up into flower shapes and some into larger flowers.

DSCN2769.JPG

Traditional hexagon patchwork has never really appealed, but Auntie Sheila had pieced these, so I put them in the back of the wardrobe as a possible project for the far distant future.

When I was packing for our holiday in the Lake District in May, I was looking for a fairly straightforward project to work on in the evenings alongside my (non-stitching) holiday diary and I don’t know what made me get it out, especially with so many other stitching projects littered around the house, but I did, and it was a winner. Since most of the hard work was done, it was quite soothing starting to put the larger flowers together and I worked on it again when we went away to the Scottish Borders in August.

I’ve nearly completed the middle section which is blues around a central cream and rust flower. It is a proper rust, not garish orange as the photo suggests.

DSCN2773.JPG

For the next round I’m starting to sort through the pile of smaller hex flowers for ones in cream and rust and there are some florals in a similar colour which I think I’ll incorporate too. I want to use as many of Auntie Sheila’s blocks and fabrics as possible but I also want it to work pattern-wise, so compromises will need to be made. A long-term project, this one.

Read Full Post »

I will confess to using something I already had for the Travelling Book this month, but when I leafed through Eileen’s book and saw how much of it was inspired by gardens and the natural world, I immediately thought of the meadow grasses piece I stitched based on a piece of work from a Folio our branch of the Embroiderers’ Guild borrowed from headquarters a couple of years ago.

DSCN1050

I photocopied the page from my sketch book with all the inspiration detail on it…

DSCN1054.JPG

And then tidied up the finished piece to go on the facing page.

DSCN1053

It’s really nice to be able to find a home for something you’ve stitched and love but have no immediate use for and also to have a bit of room to breathe this month rather than frantically stitching at the last moment!

I’ve also been enjoying upcycling jewellery. Each piece is different and I love looking at these broken down bits and working out how to make them wearable again.

The soft creamy rose pinks and faded greens of these patchwork and vintage lace covered earrings is so much nicer than the brash plastic cabochon I started off with.

DSCN0939.JPG

And it was lovely to sort through my sea glass collection to find some matching aqua coloured pieces to repair a bib necklace where some of the plastic decorative elements were missing. I didn’t realise quite how much I had amassed as it’s in different places according to where I collected it from!

DSCN0946.JPG

The central piece is from Polperro in Cornwall and most of the other pieces are from Seaham. It’s so nice to be able to showcase some of this beautiful glass. They’re both now in my Etsy shop and I hope they find new leases of life very soon!

Read Full Post »

We’ve just had a typically wet, but in spite of that, very enjoyable week sharing a cottage with friends in the Lake District. I’m on with my holiday journal which is a mix between an altered book and the found object journalling I did a couple of years ago in Cornwall. No pictures of that yet, but here are some of the lovely things that I came across in our exploration of the Lakes which have inspired me.

Stencilled Hessian wall covering, Blackwell House, Bowness:

Stencilled Hessian wall covering, Blackwell House, Bowness

 

Just one example of the stunning stained glass at Blackwell House.

Stained glass, Blackwell House, Bowness

 

Inlaid detail on a bureau:

Detail of a bureau, Blackwell House, Bowness

 

A period Arts and Crafts sofa:

Arts and Crafts sofa, Blackwell House, Bowness

…and the plasterwork between picture rail and ceiling:

Decorative plasterwork, Blackwell House, Bowness

Beautiful whitework on a pillow:

Whitework, Blackwell House, Bowness

…and the pieced patchwork hexagon fans of the 1911 quilt on the same bed:

Patchwork bedspread, Blackwell House, Bowness

Wet slate roofs in Chapel Stile:

Slate roofs, Chapel Stile

 

Crewelwork bedspread at Brantwood House near Coniston, the home of John Ruskin.

Crewelwork bedspread, Brantwood House, Coniston

An example of Ruskin lace, a type of drawn threadwork introduced by Ruskin to the Lake District as a cottage industry.

Ruskin lace, Brantwood House, Coniston

I love these cheeky sheep – one of the sculptures at Grizedale Forest.

Sethera, Grizedale Forest

Sethera, Grizedale Forest 2

 

It feels quite odd to be home – I could have happily stayed another week!

 

Read Full Post »

I’m enjoying the challenge of upcycling jewellery at the moment and I found a couple of pairs of 80s earrings – biggish, with white plastic middles (just right to tone with those classy white stilettos and matching handbag to dance round to George Michael!) and gold-tone borders – which were in fairly good condition and crying out for something interesting to be done with the blank canvas of the middles.

Initially, I toyed with pieces of cotton print and silk kimono fabric, but although the fabrics were attractive, the effect was a little thin. Then I found some scraps of fine strip patchwork and the extra thickness given by the seams was perfect.

Square upcycled patchwork earrings 1

I like being able to tuck the edges under the rolled metal borders for extra neatness.

Square upcycled patchwork earrings 2

Then the tear-drop shaped pair.

Tear-drop upcycled patchwork earrings 1

The pointed end made these a bit more challenging to work with as the fabrics wanted to fray right away on such a narrow area.

Tear-drop upcycled patchwork earrings 2

From brash 80s costume jewellery to unique textile pieces. I’m so pleased with these and my Etsy shop doesn’t know what’s hit it – three new listings in a week! Check them out here and here.

Read Full Post »

As a contrast to the rusted fabric and to fit in with the turquoise theme I stitched into a small offcut of patchwork to add to the set of blocks I’ve already finished.

Turquoise patchwork block

Each piece has been embroidered with running or seeding stitch to fit with the pattern on the fabric and the larger flowers on the left have some textured washers added over the middle of the flowers. I particularly like the way the running stitch waves in variegated turquoise thread have turned out.

I’ve started on the next block which is the darning needle fans that I rusted just before Christmas.

Darning needle fans 1

The holes that the needles left in the fabric were too good to ignore so I used my favourite variegated metallic Madeira thread to stitch a zigzag between them.

Darning needle fans 2

A few more stitches to complete the zigzags and then I’m going to put it aside and see what more, if anything, I want to do to it.

I’ve already seen, thanks to the camera’s objective eye, a mistake that I need to undo and restitch, and the stitches are very long and not very stable in the biggest fan, so I think I need to find a decorative way of making sure they are more securely set in place. I’m thinking seed beads at the moment…

Read Full Post »

These are finished now and ready for me to decide what sort of book I want to turn them into.

This is the inside of one cover – a scrap of wonderfully textured fabric which I folded over at the edges and ladder stitched into place.

And this is the patterned fabric I chose for the other.

And together…

I’ve been looking at options for the binding. I originally thought about a coptic binding but I don’t really want to put holes in the fabric covered boards, so I had a good look through some of my bookbinding books and am wondering about something more like a french link stitch where I could stitch through the fabric on the covers instead.

Something to mull over and experiment with.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »