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Posts Tagged ‘scrim’

Having finished the border for the pulled thread sampler…

Pulled thread sampler - border

…I started to fill it in with a selection of pulled thread stitches. First, Waffle Stitch:

Pulled thread sampler - waffle stitch

Using a single thread of stranded cotton pulls the scrim into lacy, open octagons. Next I wanted something a bit denser, so I chose Diagonal Cross Filling:

Pulled thread sampler - Diagonal Cross Filling

Close up you can see how the equal-armed crosses have been distorted by the tension.

Pulled thread sampler - Diagonal cross close-up

I really like the overall denseness of this pattern. Now for something completely different: Ripple Stitch, which is based on double back stitch (gives herringbone stitch on the wrong side).

Pulled thread sampler - Ripple Stitch

About half way finished. Another heavier stitch next, I think…

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Thank you all for your kind words about my pulled thread work. It’s actually a lot easier than it looks. All you need to concentrate on is accurate counting (as in any counted thread work) and even pulling of the thread and the shapes and effects sort of produce themselves. And it builds up nice and quickly too.

Here’s the next phase: more triangular stitch on the top left side.

Pulled thread phase 3:1

And after a couple more rows of the triangular stitch, some random diamond stitch at the top to complete the main part of the pulled thread section.

Pulled thread phase 3:2

All the sea glass etc is stuck on at the moment, so the next job was to stitch the fabric pieces down invisibly to make them sit flatter against the scrim. You can hopefully see the difference between the larger leaf green piece on the left, which I’ve already stitched and the smaller ocean green piece which is still to be done.

Pulled thread phase 3:3

Eyelets next and then I have to bite the bullet and think of some sort of extra (but still in keeping) fastening for the real sea glass as I don’t think just glue is going to keep them secured well enough during their travels.

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For my first travelling book piece I wanted to use pulled thread work around the sea glass and faux sea glass to look like ripples in the sand. I’ve dabbled in pulled thread before and I love the way the fabric distorts to create textures. So I hooped up my sea glass…

Beach ripples 1

…and found a fantastic thread almost the same colour as the scrim to work with. This is ripple stitch.

Beach ripples 2

And this is diamond stitch, although I’ve worked it as single zig-zag rows.

Beach ripples 3

First stage:

Beach ripples 4

Then some more diamond stitch rows to join the ripple stitch section.

Beach ripples 5

Next, reeded stitch joining the diamond stitch ripples.

Beach ripples 6

End of the second stage:

Beach ripples 7

Loving this, so it was a real delight when I randomly picked a technique to work for our Embroiderers’ Guild exhibition in the summer and found it was pulled thread work!!

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I’ve been looking forward to the January meeting of our branch of the Embroiderers’ Guild as it’s the start of our travelling books project. I’ve always been interested in the idea of round robins and I’m really looking forward to not only getting my own book back in 6 months time, but also to stretching my creative practice by working in other people’s books within their rules.

We’ve all started with a spiral bound A5 sketchbook to which I need to add a cover, especially as I managed to drop some chutney on it from my lunch… I’m going to have a welcome and guidelines page on the back of the front endpaper and then there was a spare page facing, so I’ve started to put my name and quick contact details there in Zentangle style. (There are full contact details on the inside of the back cover)

Contact details page

Then I started on my first piece. I’ve decided that I’d like a theme to my travelling book and so have chosen one close to my heart – the sea. This of course, led to play-time with the bagful of glass I beachcombed from Polperro last summer.

Travelling book sea glass 1

 

I’m sure you’ve noticed that there’s something a little odd about some of the nuggets in the photo above. If you look closer…

Travelling book sea glass 2

 

…there are imposters…

Travelling book sea glass 3

…in hand dyed silk and indigo shibori cotton.

Travelling book sea glass 4

The background fabric is a lovely natural coloured scrim and I plan to use pulled thread work around the pieces of ‘sea glass’ and ‘pottery’ to give the impression of them being scattered in the sand of the beach.

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Early in our holiday we walked the Camel Trail from Wadebridge to Padstow and while in Padstow visited the National Lobster Hatchery as my youngest wanted desperately to adopt a lobster. I bought a gorgeous retro-styled tea-towel in the shop which came with a hand stamped tag depicting the two lobsters of the Hatchery logo that I had to incorporate into my journal.

Lobsters hiding in seaweed was my first thought.

I started with a base of light-weight hand dyed calico with splodges of deep green and then added some strips of dark green hand dyed scrim, which was all bunched up and curled up on itself. I stitched the scrim strips loosely to the background with blanket stitch and then cut round the fronds I’d created with a pair of sharp scissors, also adding some fronds of the base fabric to fill in any spaces.

Lobster Hatchery tag 1

I had some of the pale green silk organza ribbon I’d used to edge the cover left, so I cut it into shapes and used it to back some of the fronds by couching a line of green chenille thread down the middle of the whole frond.

Lobster Hatchery tag 2

I pierced holes in the edge of the tag and stitched through them with a simple running stitch in turquoise which I then whipped twice with a slubby thread.

Lobster Hatchery tag 2a

With the tag in place on top. The stamp hadn’t quite printed the whole image so I completed it in pencil and added black ink later.

Lobster Hatchery tag 3

Next, I cut a lobster claw shape from vilene and coloured it with water-soluble oil pastels. Reaching cautiously out from under the seaweed…

Lobster Hatchery tag 4

Stuck in place in the journal.

Lobster Hatchery tag 5

And the full spread.

Lobster Hatchery tag 6

Just need to add some text, possibly using one of the tags I made when I created the journal.

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