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Posts Tagged ‘ribbon shell edging’

Back in March I finished this embroidery on a piece of blue and gold fused fabric I’d started several years ago as I intended to use it for a cushion to sell at our local Embroiderers’ Guild exhibition in the summer.

Fused fabric cushion 1

Then it went on hold for adventures in jewellery making and also the fact that I didn’t have a cushion pad – until last weekend.

Fused fabric cushion 2

It was a very straightforward finish. I cut out the circle using the hoop as a guide line and machined it onto a piece of gold/blue shot dupion silk. Then I made some shell edging from toning blue organza ribbon and hand stitched it around the outside of the embroidered piece to hide the edge.

Fused fabric cushion 3

The stitches, both gathering and the ones holding it down, look horribly huge in close up. But actually the effect is less obvious, as in this shot.

Fused fabric cushion 4

After that it was easy to machine stitch the front and back pieces of silk dupion together, pop the cushion pad in and ladder stitch the opening closed.

Fused fabric cushion 5

I know it doesn’t exactly go with the silvery cabbage green of the garden bench but I am inordinately pleased with it! I think the pleasure is as much about how well the finished item works as well as the fact that this has been hanging  around for sooo long and now it can see the light of day and give someone else some pleasure – I hope.

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To break up the whiteness of the cap I used almost 3 metres of 1cm wide black satin ribbon to make shell edging.

The edging is simply made by using a long piece of thread and sewing a continuous running stitch in a zig zag from edge to edge of the ribbon along its length. Then you gently pull up the thread and it gathers the ribbon into a series of scalloped ‘shells’ as you can see in the photo.

You need about three times as much ribbon as the finished length.

It’s time consuming but very useful as the gathers mean it will ease round all sorts of shapes quite comfortably.

The finished length of shell edging was hand stitched around the line between the spotted voile and the lace and in order to make it easier to put on in a hurry (as I have a couple of quick changes from bonnet to house cap) I left two tails hanging down at the back.

Certainly a much better finishing touch for my costume than a mob cap.

 And here, semi-reluctantly modelled by my 13-yr old daughter.

She much prefers the waistcoat and black tails she wears as the head boy of Dr Strong’s Academy.

The show, “Young Copperfield“,  is going well in spite of the usual disappointing audiences but I will be pleased to see the back of Miss Murdstone on Saturday night – awful woman she is!!

 

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