Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘exhibition’

It was a real success.

IMG_20180630_134425.jpg

The weather was lovely and we had a steady stream of interested people through the doors to admire a room full of beautiful textile art including both people’s own projects…

IMG_20180630_134441.jpg

…and work from the last couple of years, such as the goldwork initials on the left.

IMG_20180630_134435.jpg

Bovver birds. (Wearing bovver boots…)

IMG_20180630_134520.jpg

Outcomes from Mary’s Sea Workshop:

IMG_20180630_134527.jpg

IMG_20180630_134533.jpg

Chris Gray’s amulets:

IMG_20180630_134603.jpg

My Stitch Play:

IMG_20180630_134629.jpg

Competition Pieces:

Sandra’s beautiful heliotrope fan won the Regional Award for the Competition – ‘A flower beginning with…H’.

IMG_20180630_134452.jpg

And I believe this William Morris inspired competition entry on the left is Lynda’s. Each one of those sunflower petals is an individual free standing woven picot. Stunning!

IMG_20180630_134634.jpg

Some of our Alice Fox work:

IMG_20180630_134703.jpg

As well as more projects, new…

IMG_20180630_134721.jpg

…and old.

IMG_20180630_134830.jpg

And in one corner, my jewellery stall (complete with my budding archaeologist on the left). Upcycled jewellery on the left, original jewellery in the middle and beachcombed jewellery on the right among the driftwood.

IMG_20180630_134406.jpg

I half hoped I might sell a couple of bits, but in fact I sold nine items and had so many lovely compliments and conversations that it’s a wonder my head got through the door at the end of the day!  I am so grateful to the committee for suggesting I have a stall and I am definitely ready to do something like this again – I just have to find the right type of fair/market.

Read Full Post »

Our branch of the Embroiderers’ Guild is having an exhibition at the end of June and a week last Saturday was the deadline for handing in completed pieces of work from the last couple of years to the organisers. We had very helpfully been given a list of all the meetings and workshops to jog our memories so I went down the list, annotating each one as to whether I hadn’t been at the meeting, hadn’t finished it or if it was finished, where it was. There seemed to be two main outcomes – didn’t finish, or made into a card and sent to somebody! The only finished pieces I could lay my hands on for the last two years were my faux driftwood piece…

DSCN9751

…the Chris Gray amulet…

DSCN0140

…and the Brazilian embroidery rose I’d made up into a card but not sent because I couldn’t bear to part with it!

dscn2967

So it ended up a busy week, so busy that I forgot to photograph both the nuno felting which I turned from this:

DSCN1187

…into a simple seascape and a piece of the paper stitching we did with Alice Fox recently which I mounted as a card.

The kantha fish…

20170323_172404_HDR.jpg

…was the first to be finished by stitching him onto a piece of indigo dyed fabric with rows of running stitch that merged into the kantha and then mounting over a 7 x 5 inch canvas.

20180521_144952_HDR.jpg

I also finished a selection of little stitched fragments for my Alice Fox book.

20180526_092652_HDR.jpg

20180526_092721_HDR.jpg

20180526_092736_HDR.jpg

20180526_092802_HDR.jpg

20180526_092755_HDR.jpg

But the really big finish was my English paper piecing. I get bored easily with the piecing process and when we did the workshop, I chose small equilateral triangles – probably not the best shape in the circumstances! At the end of the day I had a pile of triangles in shades of browns and indigo and absolutely no idea what to do with them.

20170429_152439_HDR.jpg

Seeing the workshop on the list I wondered if it was even possible to finish the project, but I had what promised to be a lengthy committee meeting that week and repeatedly stitching together triangles looked like the perfect way of passing the time. It was: by the end of the meeting I had all the finished triangles stitched together and an idea very firmly in my head.

Without using half triangles the shapes you can make with equilateral triangles are rather limited, so I created a diamond which I planned to stitch onto this gorgeous piece of hand dyed indigo with some quilt wadding in between and a plain piece of indigo dyed cotton for the backing.

20180524_174631_HDR.jpg

My trusty Frister and Rossmann coped easily with quilting through all the various layers along the lines of the triangles.

20180524_180249_HDR.jpg

20180524_181404_HDR.jpg

Then I joined a number of strips of woodland themed fabric in three different brown colourways to get enough and had a go at a tutorial I found online (where else?!) for adding a binding with mitred corners as you go. It worked!!

 

20180524_224008_HDR.jpg

20180524_223940_HDR.jpg

I tidied the ends up, wrote (no time to embroider) a label…

20180525_175642_HDR.jpg

…added a hanging sleeve and couched some glittery thread around the edge of the diamond to hide the line where I had machined it down. In hindsight and with more time I would have appliqued it invisibly to the top.

20180525_175620_HDR.jpg

From a handful of triangles…

20170429_135932_HDR.jpg

…to a mini quilt…

20180525_175616_HDR.jpg

…in about three days. I still can’t believe it!

Read Full Post »

As usual, and with the excuse of the last session of my jewellery course looming, I’ve been rushing to complete another project with a deadline. Scunthorpe Embroiderers’ Guild is having a ‘Showcase’ Open Day on the 27th of July and the organisers had requested us to stitch 2 and 3D owls for display.

Several weeks ago I cut these out at home and quickly hammered and polished them during one evening at my course.

Windy Rupert 1

As I’ve moved into metalworking I wanted to be able to include elements in the work that reflected my current skills and interests, and I also wanted to go back to the crazy patchwork that was my early way into embroidery.

He’s pieced from a pattern in one of my youngest’s books, using a mixture of silks and cottons in greys and black, with gold highlights, on a black silk dupion background.

Windy Rupert 2

The hammered brass eyes are held down with long stitches in gold thread over raw edged patchwork pieces with feather stitched seams and blanket stitched edging.

Windy Rupert 3

For his beak I found a triangle of reticulated brass.

Windy Rupert 4

This was attached with more long stitches in gold thread, this time criss crossing to keep the shape in place.

Windy Rupert 5

You might notice that by this point I’d replaced the grey/white piece of silk on the top of right wing, which wasn’t working, with another piece of matt grey silk from an old blouse which does.

Windy Rupert 6

By this time it was 5 hours to the Guild meeting where I needed to hand him over, finished, mounted, labelled etc. No pressure then.

Gold purl feet. Not as neat as I would like, but the clock was ticking.

Windy Rupert 7

Neither was some of the blanket stitch up to my preferred standard, but no time to take it all down. The silk dupion was laced over a piece of thick board and then stuck onto another slightly larger piece of thick white card to form a frame of sorts.

Meet Windy Rupert. It’s a long story, you had to be there, but take it from me, naming my little fat owl Windy Rupert caused a lot of hilarity in the house. I wanted to call him Bunter, but no one these days seems to have heard of the Fat Owl of the Remove.

Windy Rupert 8

I hope what he lacks in technicality he makes up for in charm. 🙂

Read Full Post »

Back in March I finished this embroidery on a piece of blue and gold fused fabric I’d started several years ago as I intended to use it for a cushion to sell at our local Embroiderers’ Guild exhibition in the summer.

Fused fabric cushion 1

Then it went on hold for adventures in jewellery making and also the fact that I didn’t have a cushion pad – until last weekend.

Fused fabric cushion 2

It was a very straightforward finish. I cut out the circle using the hoop as a guide line and machined it onto a piece of gold/blue shot dupion silk. Then I made some shell edging from toning blue organza ribbon and hand stitched it around the outside of the embroidered piece to hide the edge.

Fused fabric cushion 3

The stitches, both gathering and the ones holding it down, look horribly huge in close up. But actually the effect is less obvious, as in this shot.

Fused fabric cushion 4

After that it was easy to machine stitch the front and back pieces of silk dupion together, pop the cushion pad in and ladder stitch the opening closed.

Fused fabric cushion 5

I know it doesn’t exactly go with the silvery cabbage green of the garden bench but I am inordinately pleased with it! I think the pleasure is as much about how well the finished item works as well as the fact that this has been hanging  around for sooo long and now it can see the light of day and give someone else some pleasure – I hope.

Read Full Post »